The End For Which God Created the World

 

  • There is a difference between ultimate ends and chief ends.
    • An end may be ultimate but not be a chief end.
  • Subordinate ends are the means of ultimate ends.
    • These are ends which always serve another end.
    • They are not agreeable in themselves.
  • Ultimate ends are those that are sought for their own sake.
    • However, among ultimate ends there are superior ends of chief ends.
  • Chief ends are never valued above their chief end.
    • They are not valued in themselves.
  • Subordinate ends may be equally valued if they are necessary to their ultimate ends.
  • Last ends should be taken as ultimate ends.
    • Ends that are sought for themselves become the one true end of all ultimate ends.
    • God created the world as an ultimate end but the necessary chief end for his creation is His own glory.
  • God’s work are determined by His ultimate end.
    • Whatever God had primarily in mind when He created will dictate what He does in the world.
    • God’s providence is driven by His ultimate desire and end for which He created the world.
  • There can be only one ultimate end of creation that is agreeable in itself.
    • God must have one supreme end for which he creates – an end that all ultimate ends find their source and termination.
  • Reason by itself is a defective guide in determining God’s chief end in creation.
    • We must rely on what God has told us regarding His chief ends.
    • Revelation helps our reason but even sanctified reason is not enough – we need to rely solely on the Bible!
    • Reason can be used to answer objections to a thesis.
  • God’s acting for His own sake is no sign of deficiency in God.
    • God is not dependent on His creation in any way.
    • To say that God needed to create to fulfill Himself is to deny the truth of God’s character.
  • God’s perfections and character cannot be the end for which God created the world.
    • There must be something attained by creation.
    • God’s creation is to accomplish a real end.
  • God’s morality depends on His determination to value what is most valuable and worthy; namely, Himself.
    • God alone is worthy of being His own chief end.
    • God’s glory is worthy of the highest regard from even God Himself.
  • God shows what is most valuable to Himself by His works.
    • God’s works show His highest treasure.
    • God regards Himself highest due to His superior excellence.
  • God is infinite and therefore worth infinite adoration.
    • “God must have all possible regard.”
    • Since God is the supreme good and beauty he must have supreme regard.
  • God’s moral rectitude determines what happens in the universe.
    • God’s wisdom and His perfections determines what is fit.
  • God proposes Himself as the chief end of creation.
    • God values Himself as the ultimate end of creation.
  • What God attained in creation and aimed at in creation is His chief end.
    • God brings everything to pass that He designs.
    • His affecting of all things shows what He values the highest.
  • Many of God’s attributes could not have been exercised had he not created the world.
  • Beings exist to know the excellency of God.
    • If God is going to create beings out of an overflow of His own perfections, they are necessary made to see and savor His majesty.
    • It is not just that people might know God’s excellency but that they might delight in it.
  • God, like a fountain, sends abundant streams.
    • God works ad extra to create the world in order to show forth the glory displayed and enjoyed within the eternal Trinity.
    • God is deposed to overflow.
  • Since God is sufficient, He makes Himself His own end.
    • God delights in Himself and in His attributes.
    • God values Himself and therefore values His expressions of His own glory and worth.
  • In delighting in the effects of His glory, He delights in His being known and enjoyed.
    • God’s desire to be seen and savored is an overflow of His enjoyment of Himself.
    • His disposition to overflow shows His delight in Himself.
  • God’s glory grounds His creation and then He genuinely loves His created beings just not as a chief end.
    • He desires the delight of a people in Himself in order to display His own glory.
  • God’s sharing the knowledge of Himself shows that He is His own chief end.
    • God’s revelation has a particular content; namely, His glory.
  • God shares His happiness and holiness to show His own worth.
    • God gives Himself to the redeemed their highest good that they might show His sufficiency in the world.
    • The redeemed will increase in their knowledge and likeness to God without ever becoming God.
  • Objections:
    • Does this not make God dependent on creation?
      • Man’s happiness and God’s delight in His own glory are two separate ends.
      • God makes much of His sufficiency by saving a people for His glory by the blood of Christ.
      • God’s pleasure in us is really pleasure in Himself.
    • Does this make God selfish?
      • God is supremely valuable and must desire His own glory above all things.
      • God is the happiness of His people. He acts in the truest love to give them the gift of His own self-exaltation.
    • Is it not wrong for God to do things for His own honor and praise?
      • It is an excellent thing for God to delight in Himself above all else.
      • God is holy and holiness is essentially prizing God.
    • Are not creatures less obligated to be thankful to God when He is acting for His own sake?
      • God’s glory and the creature’s good are not at odds.
      • God is good to depart Himself as supreme goodness.
      • God is completely free and nothing outside of Him acts upon Him.
    • Revelation is the only sure guide.
    • Scripture shows that God makes Himself the ultimate end of creation.
      • God is the first and last, the source and end of all things.
    • God does not create to have perfections but from perfections.
      • God overflows but does not gain.
    • God’s ultimate end in providence shows His chief end.
      • His end of all moral agents shows His aim in creation.
      • The end of all goodness in moral agents displays God’s glory.
      • The ultimate end of the saints in their truest frame is the end for which God created the world (especially beautiful notification).
    • God’s acting for Himself is the same as His acting for His glory.
      • God’s moral world is made for the glory of God.
      • God’s ultimate end in His moral creatures is the glory of God.
    • God’s makes it our duty to seek God’s glory as our highest good.
      • “God’s glory is the Alpha and Omega in the prayer.”
      • Saints at their best delight in God’s glory as their highest good.
    • The ultimate end of Christ’s atonement was the glory of God.
      • His great accomplishment on the cross proves the worth of God.
      • Christ’s highest comfort is that the Father will receive the honor due His name.
      • The ultimate end of redemption is the glory of God.
    • God’s wrath and mercy show forth His glory.
    • God made creatures to make His perfections known.
      • God’s name is the highest good of Himself and His people.
      • Salvation is for God’s namesake.
      • The happiness of God’s redeemed serves the end of God’s name.
    • The Bible speaks of God’s excellency and greatness as His ultimate end in creation.
      • God’s glory is peculiarly shown in His grace towards ruined sinners.
    • God’s praise is the ultimate end of creation.
      • Praise is the ultimate motivation for redemption.
    • God’s grace is pleasing to God in itself while His justice serves another end.
      • Salvation and damnation are disproportionate.
    • The entire cosmos is being governed for the certain good of God’s people.
      • God’s name is tied to the happiness of His people and so He works all things for their good: His glory.
    • What is meant by God’s glory?
      • God’s internal glory is His intrinsic value and worth, His beauty and holiness.
      • God’s external glory is the going public of His internal perfections that is seen and enjoyed.
        • God’s glory is also seen in its emanations. The suns beams belong to the sun.
      • God would have His glory known.
        • Honor implies knowledge. God can only be honored if He is truly known.
        • Glory implies praise, enjoyment and treasuring.
      • God’s external glory is reflected in two faculties: knowing and willing.
        • God desires and demands to be seen but also savored.
      • God is the beginning, middle and end of all things – including Himself.
      • God’s commitment to Himself means that He is committed to the joy of His creatures.
        • God is most glorified (shown to be worthy and valuable) when we are most satisfied in Him (treated as most worthy).
        • God has tied His glory to His people’s joy in His Son.
      • Heaven is God-centered.
        • In glory, men will know God perfectly but not exhaustively.
        • Man will continue to revel in the glories of Jesus Christ forever and ever.
        • God will be shown to be the supreme treasure of the universe in the eternal, inextinguishable worship of His people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements